Frequently Asked Questions

About Our Courses

Absolutely. In fact, most individuals going for their crane rigging and signal person designations take the courses online in their free time.

We currently offer the following rigging and signal person courses online:

Absolutely. If you have less than five employees needing their rigging and signal person designations, our online courses will save you time and money.

Employees can sign up individually. Or, you can pay for all of your employees at one time and we'll sign them up for you. Call our office at 800-674-5844 to enroll multiple employees.

If you have more than 5 employees needing their rigging and signal person designations then we offer On-Site Training. To learn more about scheduling on-site training call us Toll Free at 800-674-5844.

We currently offer the following rigging and signal person courses online:

All of our online courses are self-paced and you can take them whenever you have the time available. Once you enroll in a course you'll have access to the course material for up to a year.

The exceptions to this are the Certified Rigger Level 1 training package, the California Certified Rigger Level 1 training package and the Certified Signal Person course. These packages include a timed exam that needs to be completed in one session. But, the initial course material can be completed at your own pace.

Most students complete the courses in:

  • Qualified Rigger Level 1: 5-6 hours
  • Certified Rigger Level 1: 7-8 hours
  • California Qualified Rigger Level 1: 5-6 hours
  • California Certified Rigger Level 1: 7-8 hours
  • Certified Signal Person: 2-3 hours

You'll be emailed a digital copy of your certificate as soon as you successfully complete a course or exam. You can download and print or email the certificate right away for your employer then, too.

Students who complete our Certified Rigger Level 1, California Certified Rigger Level 1 or Certified Signal Person exam packages also receive a wallet ID card. This is mailed to you and usually arrives within 1 to 2 weeks.

You must use a computer to take our courses. Many slides have drawings and pictures which are too large to see and understand on a phone screen. Most quizzes also have drawings of load examples which you won't be able to see accurately on your phone.

Basic Questions about Rigging Training

These two terms seem to be similar but are not. 29 CFR 1926.32 defines the two terms.

A "Competent person" means someone who is capable of identifying existing and predictable hazards in the surroundings or working conditions AND who has authorization to take prompt corrective measures to eliminate them.

A "Qualified Person" adds one of two conditions. It is someone who has either a recognized degree, certificate, or professional standing, or who by extensive knowledge, training and experience, has successfully demonstrated his ability to solve problems relating to the project.

At a minimum, a "Competent Person" must have authority to take prompt measures to eliminate hazards at the work site. This is the reason a competent person is required under inspection requirements in 29 CFR 1926.650 and 29 CFR 1926.651.

The definitions provide that a qualified person must have a recognized degree, certificate, etc., or extensive experience and ability to solve the subject problems, at the worksite. This is the reason why 29 CFR 1926.651(f) requires that supporting systems design shall be by a qualified person.

Yes. If a person has the recognized degree, certificate or extensive experience and ability to solve problems at the work site AND they have the authority to take the measures to eliminate hazards at a work site then they meet both criteria.

A "Qualified Person" will have a recognized degree, certificate or extensive experience, however, if they do not have authority to eliminate hazards on a site then they can not be considered a "Competent Person".

Likewise, an individual who has the ability to recognize hazards and the authority to eliminate them, but does not have a degree, certificate or demonstrated extensive experience should not be considered a "Qualified Person".

OSHA clarified this in their standards stating "Employers must use qualified riggers during hoisting activities for assembly and disassembly work and whenever workers are within the fall zone and hooking, unhooking, or guiding a load, or doing the initial connection of a load to a component or structure."

So, a "Qualified Rigger" is a rigger who meets the standard of a "Qualified Person". A "Qualified Rigger" has a recognized degree, certificate, professional standing, or extensive knowledge, training and experience related to rigging, and who can successfully demonstrate the ability to solve problems related to rigging loads.

At a minimum, riggers need to be qualified. A "Qualified Rigger" has a recognized degree, certificate, professional standing, or extensive knowledge, training and experience related to rigging, and who can successfully demonstrate the ability to solve problems related to rigging loads.

A "Certified Rigger" means you have taken the next step in your career by passing an exam which covers the essentials of being a Qualified Rigger. A "Certified Rigger" has successfully demonstrated their ability to evaluate rigging a load, the mathematical skills to calculate proper rigging of a load, and the ability to create a Lift Plan.

Certified Riggers are certified for 2 years and are provided with a wallet ID card and electronic certificate suitable for presentation to an employer.

Requirements of a Signal Person

A Signal Person is one of the most important jobs on a work site. OSHA has specific qualifications for a Signal Person.

  • You must know and understand the type of signals used including the Standard Method for hand signals.
  • Be competent in the application of the type of signals used.
  • Have a basic understanding of equipment and crane operation and limitations, including the crane dynamics involved in swinging and stopping loads and boom deflection from hoisting loads.
  • Know and understand the relevant requirements of § 1926.1419 through § 1926.1422 and § 1926.1428. 1926.1428(c)(5)
  • Demonstrate that you meet the OSHA requirements through an oral or written test, and through a practical test.

This last requirement is included in our Certified Signal Person package. It includes a written exam and a practical test to meet the OSHA requirement.

OSHA requires you to be evaluated by a Qualified Evaluator to make sure you have met the requirements to be a Signal Person. This evaluator can be either a training company or in-house. But, OSHA has specific requirements of the Qualified Evaluator.

A Qualified Evaluator, such as a training company, is independent, has the expertise, and has already developed the training program, written tests and practical tests to accurately assess whether individuals meet the Qualification Requirements for a Signal Person. This is why we include a Practical Interview in our course so you meet the OSHA requirement.

An in-house Qualified Evaluator is an employee of your employer who has demonstrated that they are competent in accurately assessing whether individuals meet the Qualification Requirements for a signal person.

Employers must make the documentation of the signal person’s qualifications available at the worksite, either in paper form or electronically.

Upon successfully completing our Signal Person course, you'll receive a digital and paper certificate documenting that you are a qualified Signal Person under the requirements of the standard.